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Queloides III - Keloids III
 Raza y Racismo en el Arte Cubano Contemporáneo
Race and Racism in Cuban Contemporary Art
www.queloides-exhibit.com

Queloides III - Keloids III is an art exhibit that seeks to contribute to current debates about the persistence of racism in contemporary Cuba and elsewhere in the world. The exhibit was hosted at the Centro Wifredo Lam in Havana (April 16-May 31, 2010), then transferred to the Mattress Factory Museum in Pittsburgh (10/ 2010-2/ 2011) and to the 8th Floor Gallery, New York, 4/11 - 7/11. It opens at Harvard University on January 25th and can be visited there through May 2012. 

The twelve artists invited to participate are renowned for their critical work on issues of race, discrimination, and identity. Several of them collaborated in three important exhibits in Havana between 1997 and 1999 (titled “Keloids I”, “Keloids II”, and “Neither Musicians nor Athletes”). The last two were curated by the late Cuban art critic Ariel Ribeaux. All these exhibits dealt with issues of race and racism in contemporary Cuba, issues that had been taboo in public debates in the island. 

“Keloids” are wound-induced, pathological scars. Although any wound may result in keloids, many people in Cuba believe that the black skin is particularly susceptible to them. Thus the title evokes the persistence of racial stereotypes, on the one hand, and the traumatic process of dealing with racism, discrimination, and centuries of cultural conflict, on the other hand. Queloides/Keloids includes several art forms--paintings, photographs, installations, sculptures, videos--and offers novel ways to ridicule and to dismantle the so-called racial differences. --  www.queloides-exhibit.com

 

 

Samurai, 2009 
René Peña

Curators: 

Alejandro de la Fuente is Research Professor of History and Latin American Studies at the University of Pittsburgh. His work on slavery and race relations in Cuba and Latin America has been published in Spanish, English, French, Italian, German and Portuguese. He is the author of A Nation for All: Race, Inequality and Politics in Twentieth Century Cuba (UNC Press, 2001) and of Havana and the Atlantic in the Sixteenth Century (UNC Press, 2008). 

Elio Rodríguez Valdés is a Cuban artist whose work explores the intersections of race, gender, nationalism, and globalization. His work, which has been showcased in numerous collective and solo exhibits in Cuba, Spain, the United States, Belgium, Great Britain, Brazil, Argentina, the Dominican Republic, and Israel, is part of museum and private collections around the world.

Artists (links to their pages on AfroCubaWeb):

Pedro Alvarez
Manuel Arenas
Belkis Ayon
Maria Magdalena Campos
Juan Roberto Diago
Alexis Esquivel
Armando Manriño
Marta Maria Perez
Rene Peña
Douglas Perez
Elio Rodriguez
Joae A. Toirac
Meria Marrero

 

Invitacion/Invitationtop

Centro de Arte Contemporáneo Wifredo Lam, La Habana, 10 abril-30 mayo 2010
Mattress Factory Museum, Pittsburgh, October 8, 2010-February 27, 2011

Curaduría/Curators:
Alejandro de la Fuente
Elio Rodríguez Valdés

Esta exposición reúne a un grupo de artistas que ha trabajado seriamente sobre temas de raza, identidad y racismo en Cuba. Muchos de los participantes colaboraron antes en tres exposiciones dedicadas a estos temas y realizadas en la Habana entre 1997 y 1999: "Queloides" (Casa de Africa 1997), "Ni Músicos ni Deportistas" (1999, Centro Provincial de Artes Plásticas y Diseño) y Queloides II (1999, CDAV). Las dos últimas fueron organizadas por el desaparecido Ariel Ribeaux. Estas exposiciones contribuyeron a insertar los temas de raza, racismo y cubanidad, temas que constituyeron un tabú en el discurso oficial cubano durante décadas, en la esfera pública nacional y a promover una discusión seria y necesaria sobre los mismos. El título de dos de las exposiciones anteriores y de la presente, Queloides, captura algunos de los temas tratados por estos artistas. Los queloides son cicatrices cutáneas levantadas producidas por heridas. Aunque estas cicatrices pueden ocurrir en la epidermis de cualquier ser humano, muchos en Cuba creen que la piel “negra” es especialmente susceptible a producir queloides. De esta forma el título se refiere, por una parte, a la persistencia de los estereotipos raciales y, por otra, a los traumáticos efectos sociales y culturales del racismo. Queloides incluye formas artísticas como pintura, fotografía, instalación, escultura y video y propone nuevos modos de pensar, ridiculizar y desmontar las llamadas diferencias de raza.

This exhibit seeks to bring together a group of Cuban artists who work on issues of race, discrimination, and identity. Many of them collaborated in three important exhibits in Havana between 1997 and 1999 (titled “Keloids I”, “Keloids II”, and “Neither Musicians nor Athletes”). The last two were curated by the late Cuban art critic Ariel Ribeaux. All these exhibits dealt with issues of race and racism in contemporary Cuba, issues that had been taboo in public debates in the island for decades. “Keloids” are wound-induced raised scars. Although any wound may result in keloids, many people in Cuba believe that the black skin is particularly susceptible to them. Thus the title evokes the persistence of racial stereotypes, on the one hand, and the traumatic process of dealing with racism, discrimination, and centuries of cultural conflict, on the other hand. Queloides/Keloids includes several art forms--paintings, photographs, installations, sculptures, videos--and offers novel ways to ridicule and to dismantle the so-called racial differences.


Queloides at Harvard
, 1/25 - 5/25, Opening Reception 1/25/12

Queloides - Curator's Talk and Gallery Opening
Wednesday, January 25, 2012 - 4:00pm - 6:00pm

Event will be held in the Hiphop Archive, followed by a reception and viewing in the Rudenstine Gallery: W. E. B. Du Bois Institute, 104 Mount Auburn Street, 3R, Cambridge, MA 02138

Guest Curators: Alejandro de la Fuente and Elio Rodríguez Valdés

Queloides is an art exhibit on the persistence of racism and racial discrimination in contemporary Cuba and elsewhere in the world. Despite the social transformations implemented by the Cuban revolutionary government since the early 1960s, racism continues to be a deep wound in Cuban society, one that generates countless social and cultural scars.   Read more: dubois.fas.harvard.edu/spring-2012-queloides-race-and-racism-cuban-contemporary-art.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Queloides III Exhibitstop

Queloides Project

Mattress Factory Museum, Pittsburgh, 10/10 - 2/11

The 8th Floor Gallery, New York, 4/11 - 7/11

 

Queloides III in the Presstop

'Queloides': Artists Explore Racism in Cuba  6/14/2011 The Root: by Alejandro de la Fuente, with video - "Despite the social transformations implemented by the Cuban revolutionary government since the early 1960s, racism continues to be a deep wound in Cuban society, one that generates countless social and cultural scars. Racist attitudes, ideas and behaviors have gained strength in Cuban society during the last two decades, during the deep economic crisis known as "the Special Period," which followed the collapse of the Soviet Union. As the Cuban economy became dollarized, and competition for scarce jobs and resources intensified, racial discrimination and racial inequality increased. White Cubans began to use racist arguments to deny blacks access to the most attractive sectors of the economy (such as tourism), those in which it was possible to earn dollars or other hard currencies."

Rafael Lopez Ramos, "La Huella del Latigo" Los Lirios del Jardin  4/19/2011 : "A propósito de la recién inaugurada edición del proyecto Queloides, dialogué vía correo eléctronico con sus curadores Alejandro de la Fuente y Elio Rodríguez Valdés acerca del tema en que se centra la exposición y otros detalles relacionados con esta."

“Queloides” in New York: An Interview with the Curators  4/19/2011 Cuban Art Newsx: "Queloides is a long-term collective project in Cuban art. It’s not a project that belongs to me or to Elio, or to any of the artists who are exhibitng now. This is a project that was born in the late 1990s. The first exhibition was curated by Alexis Esquivel and Omar Pascual Castillo. It was a modest exhibit, in 1997, at Casa de Africa in Havana. It got very little press coverage, and very little recognition. Then there was a second, bigger exhibit organized by the late Ariel Ribeaux Diago in 1999. Ariel Ribeaux began to expand the project—gave it additional theoretical coherence. And then of course Ariel Ribeaux died a few years later and the project got suspended. Nothing else happened. When I learned about these exhibits, the first thing that caught my eye was how little information was available about the exhibits themselves, and about what I saw as a very important movement in Cuban art, and in Cuban culture more generally. But the exhibits have been ignored—and continue to be, actually—in the annals of Cuban art. If you look at the best books of Cuban art, you’ll see that in most cases the exhibits are not even mentioned."

Cuban Art On the Move  4/1/2011 ArtNews: "In 2004, curators at a Pittsburgh contemporary-art museum known as the Mattress Factory planned to bring in artists from Cuba for a group show. The exhibition would be called “Cuba: Artists in Residence.” The Bush administration prevented the artists from coming, but the curators ended up keeping the exhibition’s name as a protest. With more relaxed travel rules now in place, the museum brought nine of the 13 artists to install their works in an even bigger show of contemporary Cuban art, which opened in October 2010."

Queloides/Keloids: Race and Racism in Cuban Contemporary Art  3/1/2011 Art Nexus: "Racism is a worldwide problem and traces can still be found even in developed countries where contemporary waves of migration happen. This is particularly prevalent in countries where there has been a history of racial confrontations and discrimination. One of these countries is Cuba, and despite the government¿s claim that racism was abolished in the 1960s, reality shows otherwise." [Great to hear there is no more racism in the US!]

Alejandro de la Fuente y Michael Olijnyk nos hablan sobre "Queloides"  2/26/2011 YouTube: "Tuyomasyo Art presenta: Alejandro de la Fuente y Michael Olijnyk nos hablan sobre "Queloides" Race and Racism in Cuban Contemporary Art. Michael Olijnyk Co-director de Mattress Factory y Alejandro de la Fuente historiador y curador de la muestra."

Cuban art exhibit at Mattress Factory winning accolades  2/18/2011 Pittsburgh Post Gazette: "It isn't easy to pull off a ground-breaking exhibition, but by several measures "Queloides: Race and Racism in Cuban Contemporary Art" was worth the trouble."

"Queloides" Catalog  1/6/2011 Matress Factory Shop: "Queloides: Race and Racism in Cuban Contemporary Art," companion volume to the exhibition of the same name at the Mattress Factory Museum in Pittsburgh, PA, documents the complete exhibition in the United States as well as the previous Queloides exhibitions in Cuba. Edited by Cuban scholar and Queloides co-curator, Alejandro de la Fuente, this 172-page full-color bilingual (English and Spanish) catalog contains four essays: “Introduction: The New Afro-Cuban Cultural Movement,” by Alejandro de la Fuente; “Queloides: A History,” by Omar Pascual Castillo; “Race and Racism in Cuban Contemporary Art” by Odette Casamayor; and “Racism: Parody and Postcommunism” by Dennys Matos. The “Queloides: Race and Racism in Cuban Contemporary Art” catalog also includes extensive full-color photographic documentation of works in the exhibitions at the Wifredo Lam Center and the Mattress Factory and biographies of each of the 13 artists."

The Mattress Factory, Museum of Contemporary Art, Pittsburgh, Presents Contemporary Cuban Art Exhibit  12/29/2010 Artes Magazine 

“Queloides: Race and Racism in Cuban Contemporary Art” - A groundbreaking exhibition makes waves in Pittsburgh  11/9/2010 Cuban Art News: "The whole of the exhibition plays out these issues of representation and more, mainly grounded in the cultural and iconographic specificities of Cuba's history and present. The paintings of Alexis Esquivel mix layers of irony and specific detail to comment on Cuba-U.S. politics. For example, in Smile you won! (2010), the face of Obama, fragmented as if in a faded wall-poster and featureless apart from the instantly recognisable grin, turns in the direction of two fighting boxers (a major sport in Cuba), one with black skin and white shorts, the other, his negative, with white skin and black shorts."

US Welcomes Cuban Artists  10/25/2010 Art in America: "The ongoing embargo and travel restrictions between the United States and Cuba have for years made cultural exchange extremely difficult. But under the Obama administration, frosty relations have begun to thaw, and the border has become more porous. Among those Cuban nationals recently issued visas to enter the U.S. are nine visual artists, eight of whom were to begin residencies in mid-September [shortly after this issue went to press] at the Mattress Factory in Pittsburgh, where they are creating site-specific installations for the exhibition “Queloides/Keloids: Race and Racism in Cuban Contemporary Art” [Oct. 15, 2010-Feb. 27, 2011]. The ninth artist, Yoan Capote, is traveling to New York for his first U.S. solo show, at Jack Shainman Gallery [Oct. 14-Nov. 13]. In 2006, Capote received a Guggenheim fellowship but was barred from entering the U.S. to accept the award. Now, four years later, he has been granted an extended visa allowing him to stay in the U.S. to undertake the fellowship."

The Audacity of a Cuban Curator  10/21/2010 Havana Times: "[Havana Times:] You’ve been banned from Cuba due to the exhibition. What happened? [Alejandro:] We presented this project to Cuba’s cultural authorities in 2008. I wanted to show it first in Havana because I didn’t want to do it only for foreign consumption. I understood that this was a polemic project, but I also thought that the situation had changed in the island. Racism is something that has been recognized even by Fidel Castro, who had acknowledged publicly that racism has not been solved. The cultural authorities were never quite enthusiastic about the project, but they said we could do it. The authorities had no chance to select the artists. I think several of the bureaucrats started having nightmares that this might endanger their positions and their privileges or that state security may call them. Maybe they did call them."

Cuban Artists Grapple with Local Racism on a World Stage Read more:10/19/2010 Utne: "Starting in 1991, numerous Cuban musicians, writers, painters, performers, and academics began to use art to process the troubling changes taking place in their country. For instance, the emergence of Cuban hip hop dates to the Special Period, with rap artists driven to write about their everyday struggles. Around the same time, Cuban visual artists began to fixate on a particular social issue. In paintings, photographs, installations, sculptures, videos—examples of which are included in “Queloides”—artists focused on finding ways to ridicule and to dismantle the so-called racial differences in Cuba."

Sugerencias para una dermatología nacional  10/17/2010 Enuentros 

"Queloides" Race and racism in Cuban Contemporary Art.  9/20/2010 YouTube 

Racism in Contemporary Cuba Explored in Mattress Factory Exhibition, Cocurated by Pitt’s Alejandro de la Fuente  9/13/2010 Pitt Chronicle 

EXHIBITION: QUELOIDES/KELOIDS - Race and Racism in Cuban Contemporary Art  9/6/2010 Mattress Factory, Pittsburgh: October 15, 2010 – February 27, 2011

Queloides: Race and Racism  9/1/2010 Islas: by María I. Faguaga Iglesias, Historian and anthropologist, Havana, Cuba. Islas receives NED funding. - "The conceptual and socially committed art we see in Queloides is not gratuitous, even if many who are consciously or subconsciously racist may think it somewhat forced or uncomfortable— a much too elaborated stretch. Cuban television took one month to cover Queloides, although for no apparent reason it had to be visited from the rear of the building, as used to be the case before 1959, when black and mulatto people had to do just so. Not too few now would like to see that happen now. This kind of observation or comment can always garner one accusations of being too sensitive, racist, and divisive, to which is added no one sees that but you,you and your bad intentions and your habit of harping on racism. These are the facts."

SENTENCIADA AL SILENCIO  6/18/2010 Primavera Digital: Por Juan Antonio Madrazo Luna, CIR - "La promoción de la muestra más allá del silencio de la prensa oficial, estuvo vedada al contacto con los medios audiovisuales. La reactivación incipiente del debate, aun no rezuma honestidad. No se garantiza la libertad de contenido, la transparencia de interrogantes y respuestas. El abordaje de este tema es recibido con la indiferencia sarcástica de una demagogia blanda. Los medios de comunicación no responden ni ayudan al emplazamiento de una demanda social. La prensa como siempre sigue de espaldas a lo que ocurría. La única publicación cubana que hizo una reseña sobre la muestra fue La Jiribilla digital, totalmente vedada para la mayoría de los lectores cubanos."

Queloides - Raza y Racismo en el Arte Cubano Contemporáneo  5/1/2010 Universes in Universe: "Después de décadas de silencio oficial, las discusiones sobre "raza" y racismo han tomado un protagonismo en la Cuba contemporánea. Desde los años 1990, numerosos intelectuales - músicos, escritores, artistas plásticos, actores y académicos - han comenzado algo anteriormente impensable: denunciar la persistencia de la discriminación racial en la sociedad socialista cubana."

Raza y racismo en el arte contemporáneo Queloides: más que una herida  4/17/2010 Jiribilla: "La muestra que presenta por estos días el Centro de Arte Contemporáneo Wifredo Lam, se conecta con la tradición antropológica y sociocultural del arte cubano, que en el abordaje de la raza, ha tenido exponentes de la talla del propio autor de “La jungla”, Agustín Cárdenas, los artistas de Volumen I, Elso Padilla o Manuel Mendive. Esta intervención continúa, además, ese propósito arriesgado de abordar desde la plástica un tema tan espinoso como el de la discriminación y la racialidad, con raigambre profunda, despojándose de lo folclórico y lo banal."

Queloides: la cicatriz renovada del racismo en Cuba  4/16/2010 CubaEncuentro: "El día 16 de abril se inaugura en el Centro de Arte Contemporáneo Wifredo Lam, de la Habana, la exposición Queloides: Raza y Racismo en el Arte Cubano Contemporáneo (www.queloides-exhibit.com). La exposición reúne a doce artistas que, durante años, han proyectado, desde su obra, una preocupación sostenida acerca de la persistencia del racismo en la sociedad cubana y que han intentado discutir públicamente los efectos culturales y sociales de esa llaga, infamante e incómoda, de la cubanidad."

Blackness and Racism in Cuba: International Exhibitions Shows in Havana, Pittsburgh, and Johannesburg  4/12/2010 Cuban Art Newsx: "Half a century ago, the Cuban Revolution brought about immediate positive changes for Cubans of African descent, as the country undertook the task of eliminating racial discrimination at workplaces, social centers, educational institutions, and in official policy. The government implemented concrete measures to more fully integrate blacks into the island’s social and economic life, from which had they had been more or less excluded since the turn of the 20th century. But lately, debates held across the island have pointed up the contradictions in this stated policy of equality, including the harsh realities of everyday racism and the persistence of white dominance of official history."

Queloides/Keloids: Raza y Racismo en el Arte Cubano Contemporáneo  4/10/2010 Negra Cubana 

The New Afro-Cuban Cultural Movement and the Debate on Race in Contemporary Cuba  12/4/2008 Journal of Latin American Studies: "This paper analyses recent debates on race and racism in Cuba in the context of changing economic and social conditions in the island. Since the early 1990s, and largely in response to the negative effects that the so-called Special Period had on race relations, a group of artists and intellectuals began denouncing the persistence of racist practices and stereotypes in Cuban society. Although they are not organised around a single program or institution, these musicians, visual artists, writers, academics and activists share common grievances about racism and its social effects. It is in this sense that they constitute a new Afro-Cuban cultural movement. It is too early to fully assess the impact of this movement, but these artists and intellectuals have been largely successful in raising awareness about this problem and bringing it to the attention of authorities and the Cuban public."

Queloides: la cicatriz renovada del racismo en Cuba, Alejandro de la Fuente, 4/10top

El día 16 de abril se inaugura en el Centro de Arte Contemporáneo Wifredo Lam, de la Habana, la exposición Queloides: Raza y Racismo en el Arte Cubano Contemporáneo (www.queloides-exhibit.com). La exposición reúne a doce artistas que, durante años, han proyectado, desde su obra, una preocupación sostenida acerca de la persistencia del racismo en la sociedad cubana y que han intentado discutir públicamente los efectos culturales y sociales de esa llaga, infamante e incómoda, de la cubanidad. Los artistas que participan en Queloides no están interesados en reciclar la imagen tradicional, edulcorada y placentera, de la nación fraterna, sino en examinar y destacar las grietas que, particularmente desde la crisis de los años noventa, han asolado a ese modelo de nación. Son grietas económicas, sociales y culturales que han terminado por escindir a los cubanos en grupos con oportunidades y futuros diferentes, que han producido y producen cada día cubanos de "firmas" y de cemento, cubanos de carrito y de camello, cubanos ricos y cubanos pobres, cubanos de dólar y cubanos de peso, cubanos blancos y cubanos negros. Una vez producidos (y a pesar de serlo), esos grupos son exhibidos con desfachatez positivista para afirmar que las diferencias son obra de la naturaleza, cuestión de células y de misteriosas secuencias proteicas. Contra el acido desoxirribonucleico (el ADN), no se puede. De hecho, y esto es algo que se escucha con frecuencia en las tertulias habaneras, la revolución cubana es la prueba mejor de que las diferencias raciales son inquebrantables y fijas. Los que así piensan argumentan que si después de varias décadas de planes sociales igualitarios y de oportunidades educacionales los negros siguen apostando por la cabilla, el bisneo o el invento, tendrá que ser porque están biológicamente predestinados para eso. Tendrá que ser porque ese es el lugar que les corresponde en el orden natural de las cosas. Porque hay una tara insuperable. Para ellos, mandarria y tambor. Para los otros, el ordenador y el arpa.

Es para contrarrestar esa narrativa redundante, circular y degradante, que el proyecto Queloides ha sido concebido. Los queloides son cicatrices patológicas que aparecen en el lugar de una lesión producida por incisiones o heridas traumáticas. Estas cicatrices pueden ocurrir en la epidermis de cualquier ser humano, pero muchos en Cuba creen que las mismas aparecen solo en la piel “negra.” Es decir, los queloides son invocados en el saber popular como evidencia "científica" de que las diferencias raciales son reales, evidencia de que los individuos "negros" y "blancos" pertenecen a grupos raciales con constituciones genéticas delimitadas y diferentes. De esta forma el título de la exposición se refiere, por una parte, a la persistencia de los estereotipos raciales y, por otra, a los traumáticos efectos sociales y culturales del racismo. A fin de cuentas, estamos hablando de cicatrices y heridas, de incisiones y pieles desgarradas, de tejidos sociales que intentan reconstituirse ante el efecto demoledor y frustrante del racismo y la discriminación racial. Cada persona que es rechazada para un empleo atractivo por no tener una "apariencia agradable," o porque el encargado de contratar asume que ciertos trabajos no son apropiados para "negros," es un queloide en el tejido social cubano. Una afrenta. Una vergüenza. Cada afrodescendiente detenido arbitrariamente por la policía y obligado a mostrar papeles de identidad, por precaución lombrosiana, es una bofetada a la nación. Cada chiste racista, cada alusión a palestinos y negrones, cada aforismo denigrante, es un zarpazo al sueño de una cubanidad integrada y mejor. Este ha sido el sueno de los hijos más ilustres de Cuba, el sueño de Juan Gualberto Gómez, Rafael Serra y Martín Morúa Delgado; el sueño de Lino D'Ou, Gustavo Urrutia y Ángel Pinto; el sueno de José Martí, Antonio Maceo y Nicolás Guillen; el sueño de Evaristo Estenoz y Pedro Ivonet. Nuestro sueño. Mi sueño.

Es desde ese sueño compartido que, junto al artista Elio Rodríguez Valdés (El Macho), concebimos una nueva edición de Queloides. Nueva porque esta exposición forma parte de un proyecto curatorial desarrollado por Alexis Esquivel y Omar Pascual Castillo en un primer Queloides (Casa de África, 1997) y retomado por el desaparecido crítico y escritor Ariel Ribeaux Diago, que fue el curador del segundo Queloides, expuesto en el Centro de Desarrollo de Artes Visuales de la Habana en 1999. Ribeaux fue también el organizador de una exposición intermedia, Ni Músicos ni Deportistas, que fue acogida por el Centro Provincial de Artes Plásticas y Diseño de la Habana en diciembre de 1997. Lo que estoy diciendo es que Queloides es un proyecto colectivo de larga duración, en el que han colaborado numerosos artistas plásticos, intelectuales, críticos, escritores e instituciones culturales cubanas. El propósito siempre ha sido, como expresó Esquivel en alguna ocasión, ofrecer una visión en la que los afrodescendientes y sus culturas no fueran simplemente raíces ("pretérito investigable") de lo cubano, sino actores sociales con retos, metas e historias atendibles y específicas. Gente que labora, estudia, hace el amor y sueña, como cualquier otra, pero cuya existencia está marcada por la huella maldita y lacerante del racismo. Estos son los afrodescendientes que, bajo el impacto demoledor del llamado Período Especial, encontraron obstáculos, nuevos en algunos casos, reciclados en otros, que limitaron significativamente su ascenso social. La "raza oscura y discriminada" del grupo de rap Hermanos de Causa, la que no ha podido acceder a instalaciones y a espacios sociales privilegiados, dolarizados y blanqueados. La de los albañiles y los presos.

Algunos de los artistas participantes en esta edición de Queloides han estado en todas y cada una de estas exposiciones: Elio, Esquivel, René Peña, Douglas Pérez y Manuel Arenas. Otros, como Juan Roberto Diago, Pedro Álvarez y José A. Toirac, lo han hecho en alguna de las muestras anteriores. Armando Mariño, Belkis Ayón, Marta María Pérez Bravo y Magdalena Campos Pons se unen al proyecto Queloides por primera vez. Ya era hora de que lo hicieran, dada la calidad e importancia de sus propuestas artísticas. Las obras de Álvarez y de Ayón se incluyen por dos razones obvias. Primero, porque ambos artistas hicieron una contribución fundamental a esta conversación sobre raza, racismo y cubanidad, una contribución cuya vigencia es necesario renovar. Segundo, porque al presentarla, al hacer su obra presente, decimos que no a su ausencia inaceptable.

A diferencia de las ediciones anteriores, Queloides III va a ser presentado después fuera de la isla, en el Mattress Factory Museum de Pittsburgh, en Estados Unidos. El Mattress Factory es una institución cultural de vanguardia que ha estado siguiendo los derroteros del arte cubano durante años y que ya organizó, en el 2004, una exposición muy importante titulada Cuba: Artists in Residence (Cuba: Artistas en Residencia). Dicha exposición, realizada en tiempos en que la administración del Presidente George W. Bush criminalizó las relaciones culturales y familiares con Cuba, incluía figuras muy destacadas del arte cubano contemporáneo, como Iván y Yoán Capote, Ángel Delgado, José Emilio Fuentes Fonseca, René Francisco, Erik García Gómez, Luis Gómez, Glenda León, Sandra Ramos, Lázaro Saavedra y José A. Toirac. En colaboración con el Centro de Estudios Latinoamericanos de la Universidad de Pittsburgh, una institución que ha jugado un papel fundamental en el desarrollo de los estudios cubanos en los Estados Unidos, el Mattress Factory acoge ahora a Queloides, no solo por la calidad de los artistas participantes, sino porque los temas de raza, discriminación y racismo constituyen una preocupación global, que trasciende a la isla. El racismo, eso que el gran sociólogo y activista afronorteamericano W.E.B. Du Bois calificó como "el problema" del siglo XX, continúa produciendo cicatrices patológicas, continúa generando queloides, en pleno siglo XXI. Y no sólo en Cuba.


Links
top/Enlaces

Alejandro de la Fuente

Alexis Esquivel

Elio Rodríguez Valdés

Ni Musicos ni deportistas : sobre los imagines del  negro en el arte cubano, escrito por Ariel Ribeaux

Yoruban Contributions to the Literature on Keloids
P. OMo-DARE, M.D., Ch.M.,
Department of Surgery, University of Lagos,
Surulere, Nigeria, September, 1973

A study based on Ifa tradition and Yoruba art. This is apparently a Nigerian classic, because it is duly referenced in this recent survey:

Cutaneous adornment in the Yoruba of south-western Nigeria – past and present
www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/118619244/PDFSTART
Adekunle O. George, MBBS, FMCP, Adebola O. Ogunbiyi, MBBS, FMCP, FWACP, and Olaniyi O. M. Daramola, MBBS, FWACP
From the Dermatology Division, Department of Medicine, University College Hospital, Ibadan, and Dermatology Division, Department of Medicine, University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Nigeria
International Journal of Dermatology
Volume 45 Issue 1, Pages 23 - 27
Published Online: 5 Jan 2006

Without Masks: Contemporary Afro-Cuban Art: South Africa and Canada, includes some of the same artists and related themes

 

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