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Schedule
Discography


New CD out Sep 12, 2000


Links

Complete notes on new CD, Tribute to the Cuarteto Patria

Eliades Ochoa, Cuarteto Patria

Eliades Ochoa sings and plays guitar in Buena Vista Social Club

In early 2000, he toured with the AfroCuban Ferrín sisters who went professional in '63, and are a legend in Oriente, eastern Cuba. 

Manu Dibongo, the famous Camerounian jazz player, recorded a very fine album with Cuarteto Patria.

Schedule (updated 11/5/00)

10/26/00

Edmonton, AB

Francis Winspear Centre For Music

10/27/00

Vancouver, BC

Commodore Ballroom

10/28/00

Seattle, WA

Paramount Theatre

10/29/00

Portland, OR

Crystal Ballroom

10/30/00

Medford, OR

Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater

11/02/00

Boulder, CO

Boulder Theater

11/03/00

Oakland, CA

Paramount Theatre

11/04/00

West Hollywood, CA

House Of Blues

11/05/00

West Hollywood, CA

House Of Blues

11/07/00

New Orleans, LA

House Of Blues

11/08/00

Austin, TX

La Zona Rosa

11/09/00

Chicago, IL

Park West

11/10/00

Madison, WI

Barrymore Theatre

11/11/00

Kalamazoo, MI

Kalamazoo State Theatre

11/13/00

Alexandria, VA

The Birchmere

11/14/00

Boston, MA

Berklee Performance Ctr.

11/15/00

New York, NY

Irving Plaza

up.gif (925 bytes)

Date

City State Location

02/18/00

Minneapolis MN Fine Line Music Cafe

02/19/00

Chicago IL Old Town School

02/22/00

Towson MD Senator Theatre

02/23/00

New York NY Irving Plaza

02/24/00

Boston MA Roxy

02/25/00

Northampton MA Pearl Street

02/26/00

Alexandria VA Birchmere

02/29/00

New Orleans LA House Of Blues

03/01/00

Austin TX La Zona Rosa

03/31/00

Tokyo Japan Blue Note

Discography

Cuarteto Patria
9/99

 



 
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The Lion is Loose 8/95

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Sublime Illusion 6/99

sublime.gif (15099 bytes)

 

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  A una Coqueta
11/93

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buenavistax.jpg (5214 bytes) Buena Vista Social Club
Ry Cooder
Wea/Atlantic/Nonesuch
1. Chan Chan
2. De Camino A La Vereda
3. El Cuarto De Tula
4. Pueblo Nuevo
5. Dos Gardenias
6. Y Tu Que Has Hecho?
7. Veinte Anos
8. El Carretero
9. Candela
10. Amor De Loca Juventud
11. Orgullecida
12. Murmullo
13. Buena Vista Social Club
14. La Bayamesa

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up.gif (925 bytes)
New CD due Sept. 12 !!

Date sent: Fri, 23 Jun 2000 16:06:48 -0700
From: Michael Bloom Media Relations Musicpr@earthlink.net
Subject: Eliades Ochoa - New CD due Sept. 12 !!

 TRIBUTO AL CUARTETO PATRIA (Higher Octave World)

Early 1999. The Festival de la Trova in Santiago de Cuba is honouring Cuarteto Patria on the anniversary of its 60th year making music. The tribute centers on Francisco Cobas La O, the now-retired founder of the group, and Eliades Ochoa, who back in 1978-in an unerring choice by Pancho Cobas-became leader of the band and since then has been responsible for the quartet's growth internationally. Right there, after all the fuss over Pancho and Eliades has concluded, there is talk of putting together a commemorative album. The marketing angle would seem to call for an "all-star" recording, spotlighting Cuban artists who have been involved with Patria over the years: from Compay Segundo to Reinaldo Hierrezuelo. As names begin to be tossed around, there is talk of including some of the foreign musicians who have so gladly collaborated with Patria, like Manu Dibango, Ry Cooder, Charlie Musselwhite. Maybe some of the Spanish artists who had availed themselves of Eliades' instrumental magic, like Moncho, the so-called "gypsy of the bolero". Eliades, being the reserved Guajiro (Cuban provincial) that he is, nods his head. Sounds good.

It doesn't take him long, however, to figure out that the logistics  of it all conspire against the kind of spontaneity that he wants to  have on the project. His foreign friends live in California and Europe, and then there would have to be negotiations with other record labels. His Cuban cronies live on the other end of the island, in Havana, and have commitments with their respective groups-Compay Segundo and his Muchachos or the Vieja Trova Santiaguera. In the end, Eliades convinces Virgin to leave the all-star record for another time. A great idea is a great idea, be it today or tomorrow. And what Eliades really wants is to work comfortably, without having to worry about making schedules and itineraries mesh. What he needs is total freedom to bring together 15 songs that tell the story of Patria, which is his own story too. And that's how it comes about.

TRIBUTO AL CUARTETO PATRIA is a much-deserved recognition of Pancho Cobas and the rest who kept the flame alive when there was no Buena Vista Social Club. But more than that, it is truly a love-letter to Cuban music, to all those composer/poets who have left a sublime gift that is rediscovered by each new generation. Portions are recorded during days off in Madrid, headquarters for the group during its European tours. And the bulk of "Tributo" is recorded in Santiago de Cuba, amidst friends and family (in all truth, performing with family is nothing new, as Eliades has a brother and son playing with him in Patria). His sister María, one of those wonderful santiagueras(women of Santiago) that deserves to be introduced to the world, collaborates on two of the songs. El Guayabero, one of the other honorees at the Festival de la Trova 1999, makes good on his promise and travels to Santiago. Rey Cabrera and Armando Machado, double bass player for Los Guanches and ex-member of Cuarteto Patria, also drop by the studio. And there's a distinguished addition to the album: Anibal Ávila, superb trumpet player and ex-member of Septeto Turquino. It is fitting to stress here the fact that Cuarteto Patria is a living and breathing creature, one that demands new blood, not content to simply recite the traditional formulas. And there's another secret: never losing the African element. "Without the African ingredient, the Cuban genre loses its verve," assures Eliades, who upped the percussion component when he took the reins of Patria. And thus the miracle of "TRIBUTOŠ." Music that is traditional, yet has drive. A sound that is unsophisticated and at the same time imaginative. A songbook that goes from romance to realism. Music à la Eliades Ochoa, world traveller who is taken for a Texas cowboy when spotted in his hat and boots. No. Eliades is pure Guajiro. Guajiro from the East, my friends.

-- DIEGO A. MANRIQUE (Madrid. May, 2000)

1. YIRI YIRI BON/YIRI YIRI BON (Son) -5:00- (Benny Moré)
2. SON A LA CASADE LA TROVA/A SON FOR LA CASA DE LA TROVA (Son) -4:59- (Julio Rodríguez)
3. NO QUIERO CELOS/I DON'T WANT NO JEALOUSY AROUND (Son) -4:13- (Roberto Carrión)
4. CALDERITO DE TOSTAR CAFÉ/THE CAULDRON FOR ROASTING COFFEE (Son) -4:49- (Francisco Repilado)
5. SI EN UN FINAL/IF IN THE END (Bolero)-3:32- (Juan Arrondo).
6. CUANDO YA NO ME QUIERAS/WHEN YOU DON'T LOVE ME (Bolero) -2:52- (Cuestes Castilla)
7. SI SABES BAILAR MI SON/IF YOU KNOW HOW TO DANCE MY SON (Son) -4:38- All rights reserved
8. TIEMPO ENTERO/FULL TIME (Bolero son) -7:13- (Manolo Castillo)
9. POR CULPA DE LAS MUJERES/BLAME IT ON THE WOMEN (Son) -5:59- (Faustino Oramas)
10. QUE MURMUREN/LET THEM WHISPER (Bolero) -3:08- (Rafael Cárdenas/Rubén Fuentes)
11. ME VOY PA' SIBANUCÚ/I'M GOING TO SIBANICÚ (Son) -5:55- (Faustino Oramas). Publ.: Dos Caribe
12. ¡QUÉ SABROSEAO!/WHAT A FEELING (Guaracha) -3-49- All rights reserved

Produced by Eliades Ochoa
Production coordinator: Alex Van Looy
Recorded at Kirios (Madrid) & Egrem (Santiago de Cuba) by Clark Germain & Pedro Castro between March 1999 & January 2000
Assistant engineers: Ismael Torres & Maximo (Egrem, Santiago de Cuba)
Mixed by Clark Germain - Mastered by Bernie Grundman

Musicians:

Eliades Ochoa: lead guitar, lead vocals
Anibal Avila Pacheco: trumpet, clave
Humberto Ochoa: second guitar, vocals
Enrique Ochoa: second guitar, vocals
Eglis Ochoa: maracas, güiro, vocals
William Calderón: bass
Angel Martinez: bass
Jorge Masporel: percussion
Roberto Torres: percussion

Guests:

Faustino Oramas "El Guayabero" appears courtesy of Manzana Discos on " Por culpa de las mujeres" María Ochoa appears courtesy of Blue Jackel in " No quiero celos" Joaquin Solorzano: percussions Armando Machado: bass Rafael Casaco: second guitar Roberto Machado: percussions Rey Cabrera: tres

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=======================================

For advance music or more information,

contact Michael Bloom Media Relations at 510.658.6267 or via e-mail:  Musicpr@earthlink.net

Complete notes on Tribute to the Cuarteto Patria

PRESENTATION

At the age of six, Eliades Ochoa has his first artistic experiences after discovering his abiding affinity for the guitar. Today, at fifty-three, he is a standard-bearer for Cuban music and has a shining career behind him. This santiaguero (native of Santiago de Cuba) cowboy had his last album, Sublime Ilusión, nominated for a Grammy® in the category of Best Traditional Tropical and Latin Performance.

His successful tours in the United States and throughout the European continent have won the praise of the public and critics alike, marking the beginning of a new phase in the life and career of Eliades Ochoa and the Cuarteto Patria. Considered a living legend of Cuban son, his name enjoys international recognition and his vocals and guitar playing are in great demand for big projects by top-name artists in Cuba, Spain, America, and Italy.

In celebration of the 60th anniversary of the group that he leads, Eliades Ochoa has recorded this current album, aided by a few special guest artists: musician and composer, Faustino Oramas "El Guayabero"; songstress of traditional music, María Ochoa; double-bass player, Armando Machado; ex-member of "Cuarteto Patria," tresero (guitarist) Rey Cabrera; trumpet player, Anibal Pacheco; and percussionist Joaquín Solorzano. This illustrious group of artists have joined with Cuarteto Patria to put together a fitting tribute to the founders of Cuarteto Patria, a salute to all those who have been a part of Patria over these past 60 years.

Eliades Ochoa, Master of traditional Cuban music, we await you and your guitar Tres to take us back in time and surround us with the magical sounds of the Cuban countryside. We join you in celebrating your achievements and we accompany you to your fiesta. The fiesta of son, guaracha, and bolero.

Grisell Sande Figueredo

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

"Tributo al Cuarteto Patria" would not have been possible without the support of many people. This is why I would first of all like to thank the current members of the Cuarteto Patria.

A special thanks to Joaquin Solorzano, Armando Machado, Rey Cabrera and María Ochoa, who were present at each stage of the recording, giving the best of their knowledge as musicians.

A special acknowledgement to Faustino Oramas "El Guayabero", reknown composer, interpreter and with an exceptional artistic carreer, who, with 88 years of age and suffering the inevitable ailments of age, travelled from Holguin to give his support to the "Tributo al Cuarteto Patria".

To the tireless friends at Siboney Estudios of Santiago de Cuba, Ismael, Pedrito, Jorge Pullal, Juanita & Raciel who, with their experience, techniques, and efforts made this record what it is. To Grisell Sande, my right hand.

Finally we must mention the person to whom this record is dedicated: Francisco Coba La O, founder of the Cuarteto Patria in 1939, who was, is and will be the director of the Patria for ever. Let this tribute reach the master.

Eliades Ochoa Bustamante

1. SON A LA CASA DE LA TROVA/A SON FOR LA CASA DE LA TROVA (Son) –4:59–

(Julio Rodríguez). Publ.: Copyright Control

2. NO QUIERO CELOS/I DON’T WANT NO JEALOUSY AROUND (Son) –4:13–

(Roberto Carrión). Publ.: Copyright Control

3. YIRI YIRI BON/YIRI YIRI BON (Son) –5:00–

(Benny Moré). Publ.: Peer Music Española

4. SI SABES BAILAR MI SON/IF YOU KNOW HOW TO DANCE MY SON (Son) –4:38–

All rights reserved

5. TIEMPO ENTERO/FULL TIME (Bolero son) –7:13–

(Manolo Castillo). Publ.: Seesma Ediciones

6. POR CULPA DE LAS MUJERES/BLAME IT ON THE WOMEN (Son) –5:59–

(Faustino Oramas). Publ.: Manzana Ediciones

7. QUE MURMUREN/LET THEM WHISPER (Bolero) –3:08–

(Rafael Cárdenas/Rubén Fuentes). Publ.: Peermusic Española

8. ME VOY PA’ SIBANUCÚ/I’M GOING TO SIBANICÚ (Son) –5:55–

(Faustino Oramas). Publ.: Dos Caribe

9. SI EN UN FINAL/IF IN THE END (Bolero) –3:32–

(Juan Arrondo). Publ.: Seemsa Ediciones

10. CALDERITO DE TOSTAR CAFÉ/THE CAULDRON FOR ROASTING COFFEE (Son) –4:49–

(Francisco Repilado). Publ.: APA

11. CUANDO YA NO ME QUIERAS/WHEN YOU DON’T LOVE ME (Bolero) –2:52–

(Cuestes Castilla). Publ.: Peermusic Española

12. ¡QUÉ SABROSEAO!/WHAT A FEELING (Guaracha) –3-49–

All right reserved

13. CLARA BELLA/CLARA BELLA (Bolero son) –6:37–

(Francisco Repilado). Publ.: Vortex Dro East West

Produced by Eliades Ochoa • Production coordinator: Alex Van Looy

Recorded at Kirios (Madrid) & Egrem (Santiago de Cuba) by Clark Germain & Pedro Castro between March 1999 & January 2000

Assistant engineers: Ismael Torres & Maximo (Egrem, Santiago de Cuba) - Mixed by Clark Germain - Mastered by Bernie Grundman

Musicians:

Eliades Ochoa: lead guitar, lead vocals • Anibal Avila Pacheco: trumpet, clave • Humberto Ochoa: second guitar, vocals • Enrique Ochoa: second guitar, vocals

Eglis Ochoa: maracas, güiro, vocals • William Calderón: bass • Angel Martinez: bass • Jorge Masporel: percussions • Roberto Torres: percussions

Guests:

Faustino Oramas "El Guayabero" appears courtesy of Manzana Discos in " Por culpa de las mujeres"

María Ochoa appears courtesy of Blue Jackel in " No quiero celos"

Joaquin Solorzano: percussions • Armando Machado: bass • Rafael Casaco: second guitar • Roberto Machado: percussions • Rey Cabrera: tres

Front cover photo: Anton Corbijn • Booklet photos: Joan Tomas • Photo Pancho Cobas & Eliades: Pedro Vikingo • Inlay photo: Joan Tomas

Traduccion al inglés de las canciones: David Oancia

Pag 17:up.gif (925 bytes)

WHAT A FEELING!

Eliades recalls the way he used learn songs back in the 50's: "You would hear something live or on the radio that you liked and you would search through the Victrolas, the jukeboxes in the bars, until you found the song. Then, when you had a medio (five centavos), you would go back, drop your coin in and listen-intently

Chorus:

What a feeling

What a feeling

What a feeling, but oh so delicious

Damn, I feel so good

When I knew that you loved me

The worries that seized me

They’ve disappeared, they don’t exist

Damn, I love you so much,

My lovely Fidelina

If you deny me a yes

My little darling, I die for you

Repeat chorus

Even if your father doesn’t love you,

Even if your mother doesn’t love you,

My lovely Fidelina, I would lead

You to my house and together

We would dream a golden dream.

Goodbye friends, tell her

That soon I will wed her.

CLARA BELLA

Eliades performed this piece as a duet with Compay Segundo when Segundo was a special guest performer with Cuarteto Patria in concerts in Cuba as well as in tours in the United States and various Caribbean countries. Together they recorded "Chanchaneando con Compay Segundo", the album that first gave international exposure to "Chan Chan," which in the 90's became a sort of Cuban national anthem.up.gif (925 bytes)

I live in love

Clara, love of my life,

Lucky charm

That I’ll never forget

Which is why

When I look at you

And deem you so fine

I never think

That I have to die

Chorus:

When I die

Clara Bella who will cry for me

Pag:16

WHEN YOU DON’T LOVE ME

Another of the songs that Eliades heard back in the 50's, no doubt performed by one of the Mexican artists specializing in the boleros that were also successful in Cuba. The lyrics tell of a troubadour that leaves public life following a jilting romance, but the story is by no means an apt metaphor for Eliades, who asserts that "a musician should never retire as long as the fingers and vocal chords can rise to the occasion."

When you don’t love me anymore

Don’t pretend and show me sweetness

Don’t take pity; don’t feel compassion

Don’t feel afraid

If you want to consign me to obscurity

I wouldn’t hold it against you,

I wouldn’t scold you,

And I wouldn’t hand you the displeasure

Of looking at my sorrow.

I would set off, singing

My saddest poems softly.

I would tell the whole world

Just how much you used to love me.

And when nobody listened

To my old, weary songs anymore,

I would end my journey

In some remote village

And die.

Pag 5:

Early 1999. The Festival de la Trova in Santiago de Cuba is honouring Cuarteto Patria on the anniversary of its 60th year making music. The tribute centers on Francisco Cobas La O, the now-retired founder of the group, and Eliades Ochoa, who back in 1978-in an unerring choice by Pancho Cobas-became leader of the band and since then has been responsible for the quartet's growth internationally. Right there, after all the fuss over Pancho and Eliades has concluded, there is talk of putting together a commemorative album. The marketing angle would seem to call for an "all-star" recording, spotlighting Cuban artists who have been involved with Patria over the years: from Compay Segundo to Reinaldo Hierrezuelo. As names begin to be tossed around, there is talk of including some of the foreign musicians who have so gladly collaborated with Patria, like Manu Dibango, Ry Cooder, Charlie Musselwhite. Maybe some of the Spanish artists who had availed themselves of Eliades' instrumental magic, like Moncho, the so-called "gypsy of the bolero". Eliades, being the reserved Guajiro(Cuban provincial) that he is, nods his head. Sounds good.

It doesn't take him long, however, to figure out that the logistics of it all conspire against the kind of spontaneity that he wants to have on the project. His foreign friends live in California and Europe, and then there would have to be negotiations with other record labels. His Cuban cronies live on the other end of the island, in Havana, and have commitments with their respective groups-Compay Segundo and his Muchachos or the Vieja Trova Santiaguera. In the end, Eliades convinces Virgin to leave the all-star record for another time. A great idea is a great idea, be it today or tomorrow. And what Eliades really wants is to work comfortably, without having to worry about making schedules and itineraries mesh. What he needs is total freedom to bring together 15 songs that tell the story of Patria, which is his own story too. And that's how it comes about.

TRIBUTO AL CUARTETO PATRIA is a much-deserved recognition of Pancho Cobas and the rest who kept the flame alive when there was no Buena Vista Social Club. But more than that, it is truly a love-letter to Cuban music, to all those composer/poets who have left a sublime gift that is rediscovered by each new generation. Portions are recorded during days off in Madrid, headquarters for the group during its European tours. And the bulk of "Tributo" is recorded in Santiago de Cuba, amidst friends and family (in all truth, performing with family is nothing new, as Eliades has a brother and son playing with him in Patria). His sister María, one of those wonderful santiagueras(women of Santiago) that deserves to be introduced to the world, collaborates on two of the songs. El Guayabero, one of the other honorees at the Festival de la Trova 1999, makes good on his promise and travels to Santiago. Rey Cabrera and Armando Machado, double bass player for Los Guanches and ex-member of Cuarteto Patria, also drop by the studio. And there's a distinguished addition to the album: Anibal Ávila, superb trumpet player and ex-member of Septeto Turquino. It is fitting to stress here the fact that Cuarteto Patria is a living and breathing creature, one that demands new blood, not content to simply recite the traditional formulas. And there's another secret: never losing the African element. "Without the African ingredient, the Cuban genre loses its verve," assures Eliades, who upped the percussion component when he took the reins of Patria. And thus the miracle of "TRIBUTO…." Music that is traditional, yet has drive. A sound that is unsophisticated and at the same time imaginative. A songbook that goes from romance to realism. Music à la Eliades Ochoa, world traveller who is taken for a Texas cowboy when spotted in his hat and boots. No. Eliades is pure Guajiro. Guajiro from the East, my friends.

DIEGO A. MANRIQUEup.gif (925 bytes)

(Madrid. May, 2000)

Pag 6:

A SON FOR LA CASA DE LA TROVA

ince the late 70's Eliades has been playing this original piece by Julio Rodriguez, who has been at the helm of several Cuban music institutions. The Casa de la Trova on Heredia street is Eliades' second home. If he's in Santiago, he ends up there sooner or later, conversing with the other musicians and listening to whatever's playing on stage. And even when closed to the public, the bar and kitchen are always open for Eliades.

When you go to Santiago, my friend,

I’ll take you

To my dearest place

That you’re going to love.

When you go to Santiago, my friend

I’ll invite you to a place

Where Son Cubano

Can be heard all night long.

It’s called La casa de la Trova

A friendly spot filled

With traditional rhythms

That house is the jewel in the crown

Of Santiago, where the Son Cubano

Can be heard all night long

Chorus:

If you want to dance

If want to have a blast

To Santiago’s Casa de la Trova

I will take you.

Chorus is repeated

Pag 15:

In the Cuban East, it was common for neighbors to lend out a pot or pan for roasting coffee; Since it was casually passed around, it was not unusual to lose track of it, as Compay Segundo explains in this Son, also known as "Mi Calderito". This tune gives Eliades an opportunity to greet his friends in Santiago de Cuba.

Josefina set off yesterday

To look for a good cauldron

At a neighbour’s house,

To roast some good coffee.

It wasn’t in Antonio’s house,

It wasn’t in Inés’s house,

The cauldron has disappeared,

Another person has it.

Chorus:

But where could my cauldron be?

My cauldron for roasting coffee.

Pag 14:

IF IN THE END

Eliades met the writer of this gem of a bolero, a musician from Guanabacoa, and later accompanied him to Santiago de Cuba to participate in the Festival de la Trova (Havana and Santiago may have their differences, but art brings people together). Like so many of the greats, Juan Arrondo has already passed away, but Eliades makes it his business to ensure that their creations continue playing and stirring emotions

If in the end

I had to write

The story of my life

If in the end

I had to express

The most intense hours

It would be you

There’s no other person

Who I would write the most about

It would be you

Because in my heart

You’re the first

If in the end

I had to write

Of what my world consisted

If in the end

I had to put pen to paper

The most profound days

It would be you

As a gift for all you have done

Who I would write the most about

Because you are love,

Joy and hope

Feeling and happiness

If in the end

I had to write

Of what my world consisted

If in the end

I had to put pen to paper

The most profound days

It would be you

As a gift for all you have done

Who I would write the most about

Because you are love,

Joy and hope,

Feeling and happiness.

Because you are love,

Joy and hope,

Feeling and happiness.

Pag 7:

I DON’T WANT NO JEALOUSY AROUND

A composition by Roberto Carrión, one of so many natives of Santiago de Cuba (Santiagueros) who excelled as musicians while claiming another occupation (he was a baker). Eliades remembers "No Quiero Celos" being played on Trinchera Agraria, a radio program for peasants that began airing back in 1963 on radio station CMKN. Vocals are performed by his sister, María and joining her is Anibal, the exceptional trumpeter from Septeto Turquino.up.gif (925 bytes)

The extremely jealous

Aren’t very intelligent

Because they always believe

The things other people say.

Everyone should keep a watchful eye

On what’s around them

That way they can avoid

Their home breaking up.

It has become known

That jealousy is a form of selfishness.

That can drive both men and women

To a desperate state of helplessness.

Chorus:

I don’t want no jealousy around

Pag 8:

YIRI YIRI BON

Back in 1958, as leader of the Banda Gigante, Beny Moré visited Santiago de Cuba. He was having his shoes shined on the street when Eliades and his friends surrounded him. Eliades began to sing and play the guitar. Moré, the "Bárbaro del Ritmo" gave him fifteen cents and offered words of encouragement, saying "All the good ones start like this". Now Eliades returns the compliment by singing one of his hits, a ramble through the best that Cuba has to offer.

Chorus:

Yiri yiri bon

Yimboró, yimboró, yimboró

Boys, I love the rumba

Boys, I love the conga

I love to dance the rhythm of the drum

Struck by the black hands

Of Cubans that are sworn to

The beat of their drums.

Chorus:

Yiriyiribon, Yiriyiribon

They cut the cane in Cuba

The drink coffee in Cuba

They dance bembé in Cuba

They smoke tobacco

They drink guarapo

And following the group

They flow to the rhythms.

Chorus:

Yiriyiribon, Yiriyiribon

Yiriyiribon, Yiriyiribon

Pag 13:

I’M GOING TO SIBANICÚ

One of "El Guayabero's" most popular compositions in which he tells of a fantasy adventure in the mountains of the East. As in all of today's performances of Cuarteto Patria, Eliades Ochoa's solo is a burst of inventiveness and flavor: pure "sweet wire" as María Ochoa proclaims in "No Quiero Celos".

I’m going to Sibanicú tomorrow.

Gents, let me tell you

What happened, the fright

I suffered once with a bitch.

Turns out I found

A man ploughing the land.

It was way into the sierra,

Resembling that which cuts wood.

And I don’t know how

But a bitch jumped out and bit me.

Chorus:

Going to Sibanicú, tomorrow, tomorrow

Going to Sibanicú, tomorrow, tomorrow

The man left his workshop

To heal my gash,

I forgot about the animal

And began to talk to the man.

Afterwards he invited me to eat

The sierra’s meat and rice.

And when I finished eating

The bitch bit me again.

Chorus:

Going to Sibanicú, tomorrow, tomorrow

Going to Sibanicú, tomorrow, tomorrow

The old woman picked up a club

Grabbed a stick, the old man did,

I got clubbed upside the head,

Which nearly took off my ear.

Wanted to hit the high road, I did

But the door slammed shut,

And when I was checking it,

The bitch but bit me again.

Pag 12:

LET THEM WHISPER

This beautiful bolero has a certain Spanish feel and was popular in Cuba in the 50's. It is one of so many songs that have come to form part of the extensive treasury where Eliades Ochoa keeps the special songs that have moved him over the years. Songs that he can perform in intimate moments, among friends. Songs that would be candidates for inclusion in Cuarteto Patria's official repertoire.

Let them whisper,

I don’t care if they mutter

I don’t care what they say

Or even what they think.

Muddy water clears up

With the drifting current.

Let them whisper,

I don’t care if they mutter,

That they say you don’t love me,

That they say I don’t love you,

That you’re cheating on me,

That you’re here for my money.

Laugh at their stories

And what they daydream about,

Because when you do the things you do,

They can whisper, they can mutter.

Pag 9:

IF YOU KNOW HOW TO DANCE MY SON

Also known as "Ritmo Cubano", this one is a chá-style son from the repertoire of the illustrious Orquesta Aragón-founded in 1939 like Cuarteto Patria-and imported by Patria. It was just like Eliades to look up the current director of Aragón, Rafael Lay, Jr., when they coincided in London and ask permission to record the song for the album.

I don’t care if they criticize me

When they hear me sing

My old time Cuban rhythm.

I know very well that in the old days,

With marímbula, clave and bongó,

They played Cuban Son

Until the

Chorus

If you know how to dance my Son,

Cuban Rhythm

Pag 10:up.gif (925 bytes)

FULL TIME

A wonderful tune full of Cuban mischief that Eliades remembers learning during his visits to the Casa de la Trova, when he was a "lad" among those old-timers who were walking repositories of the great Santiaguera songs (Eliades became a member of Quinteto de la Trova group which included the writer of "Tiempo Entero"). Cuarteto Patria develops this bolero-style son leisurely, delighting in the tale of seduction as it unfolds on the dance floor

Some buddies invited me

To a party

They said, ‘come on boy

We’re going to party

There’ll be half time women

Full time.

There's all kinds and

You can choose the best.’

Got there and picked up

My half time.

Because they are the ones

I like to party with.

There was a mulata playing

With her body in such a way

That I had to show her

My dark side.

Chorus:

Half time,

Full time.

Pag 11:

BLAME IT ON THE WOMEN

El Guayabero took his 88 year-old brittle frame from his home in Holguín to Santiago de Cuba to sing with Cuarteto Patria, something for which Eliades Ochoa is extremely grateful. Of the pieces that they performed, "Por sun rose,

The dancers said.

That’s why I say,

With heart in hand

If you know how to dance my Son,

You don’t doubt Cuban rhythm.

Culpa de las Mujeres" was chosen. In it, Faustino responds to the rumors that have circulated about his being a womanizer. He also sends greetings to his friends in the Canary Islands. At the end, an impressive response by Eliades.

Chorus:

Blame it on the Women

Blame it on the Women

Look Mama, they’re going to kill me, rascal,

Blame it on the Women.

I swear to God they want to kill me.

In Tenerife, they want to kill me, scamp,

Blame it on the Women.

In Tenerife they say, that

They have hacked me with a machete...

In Tenerife they say, that

They have hacked me with a machete,

They have broken my arm

Blame it on a woman I barely knew.

Look Mama, they’re going to kill me, rascal,

Blame it on the Women.

My Juanita wants to kill me, oh God,

Blame it on the Women.

Hey Alberto, they want to kill me, scamp.

The whole world wants to kill me,

Blame it on the Women.

Look Mama, they’re going to kill me, rascal.

I don’t get into trouble with nobody,

Although I’m so popular,

I don’t get in trouble with nobody.

But women love my Son.

My Juanita wants to kill me, Oh God.

Now they want to kill me, scamp.

To he who loves his woman,

I’m going to give you some advice,

Don’t live so carefree,

Because of what might happen.

Look, they want to kill me, rascal,

Blame it on the Women

Look Mama, they want to kill me, scamp.

Look Mama, they want to kill me, oh god.

Blame it on the Women.

Blame it on the Women.

Pag 12:

Dedicated to Pancho Cobas la O,

founder of Cuarteto Patria,

Santiago de Cuba, 1939up.gif (925 bytes)

Links

Billboard
http://www.billboard.com/feature/0829ochoa.asp
Billboard feature article

 

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