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Carlos Acosta
www.carlosacosta.com

"Carlos Acosta was born in Cuba in 1973. He started dancing at the insistence of his father as a means of occupying his spare time. He began dancing at the National Ballet School of Cuba, Havana, when he was ten. In June 1991 he received his diploma with maximum qualifications and a gold medal.

He has won numerous awards ranging from the Gold Medal at the Prix de Lausanne (January 1990), to the Grand Prix and Gold Medal at the Fourth Annual Competition of Ballet in Paris (November 1990), and the Grand Prix in the third Juvenile Competition of Dance (June 1991). His most recent accolade was the International Critics’ Prize from the Chilean dance critics.

From 1989 to 1991 he performed throughout the world, guesting with many other companies including the Ballet Company of the New Theatre in Turin, Italy, Mexico and Venezuela. In the 1991/92 season he was invited to dance with the English National Ballet in London. He made his debut in the Polovtsian Dances from Prince Igor and also appeared as the Prince in Ben Stevenson’s The Nutcracker and Cinderella, partnering Eva Evdokimova and Ludmilla Semenyaka.

From 1992 to 1993 he danced as a member of the National Ballet of Cuba. In October 1993 and September 1994 he toured with the company to Madrid, Spain where he danced the principal roles in Giselle, Don Quixote and Swan Lake. In November 1993 he was invited to join the Houston Ballet as a principal dancer where he made his American stage debut as the Prince in Stevenson’s The Nutcracker.

Following this his repertory with the Houston Ballet included Prince Siegfried in Swan Lake, Solor in the third act of La Bayadère, Basilio in Don Quixote, Stevenson’s Britten pas de deux, the male lead in Harald Lander’s Etudes, and Jiri Kylian’s Symphony in D. Acosta made his first appearance with the Royal Ballet in William Forsythe’s In the middle, somewhat elevated in October 1998 and subsequently appeared as Jean de Brienne in Rudolf Nureyev’s production of Raymonda Act III, Colas in Frederick Ashton’s La Fille mal gardée, Siegfried in Swan Lake, Actaeon in the Diana and Actaeon pas de deux, the Brother in Kenneth MacMillan’s My Brother, My Sisters, Albrecht in Giselle, and the Principal Boy in Rhapsody. At the opening celebration of the Royal Opera House, Acosta performed the man’s solo in Petipa’s Le Corsaire. In the 99/2000 season he danced in Nacho Duato’s Remanso, the Prince in The Nutcracker, solo boy in MacMillan’s Gloria, Franz in Ninette de Valois’ production of Coppélia, Nijinsky’s L’Après-midi d’un faune, Des Grieux in MacMillan’s Manon, the Messenger of Death in Song of the Earth and the Boy with Matted Hair in Anthony Tudor’s Shadowplay. During the 2001/2 season he made his debut as Basilio in Nureyev’s Don Quixote, and in the 2002/2003 season he made his debut as the title role in George Balanchine’s Apollo.

He has created roles in Ashley Page’s Hidden Variables and William Tuckett’s 3:4. Television performances include two live BBC broadcasts from the Royal Opera House; the opening celebration in December 1999 when Acosta performed the man’s solo in Le Corsaire, and in February 2000 the role of Franz in Ninette de Valois’ Coppélia. Most recently Carlos Acosta was featured on Imagine, BBC 2." - brochure for Tocoro

"Tocororo tells the story of a humble boy who leaves his family and the traditions of the Cuban countryside for an urban future, loosely based on Acosta's own life story.

 Set to an original score specially composed by Miguel Núñez, Tocororo mixes infectious Cuban rhythm and symphonic styles performed live on stage by five Cuban musicians. Sixteen handpicked dancers from the leading Cuban dance company, Danza Contemporanea, are led and choreographed by Carlos Acosta.

A guest principal with the Royal Ballet, Acosta is acknowledged as one of the finest dancers of his generation. Also dancing the main role is rising Cuban star José Oduardo Perez, who is currently First Principal with Scottish Ballet. Both dancers are renowned for combining Cuban passion with a remarkable technical virtuosity and raw athleticism."

-- www.sadlerswells.com/whats_on/2003_2004/carlos_acosta_04.asp

topCarlos Acosta and Racism

Carlos Acosta has had to deal with racism his whole life, in Cuba and abroad. The latest episode, where the Spanish edition of his autobiography has been postponed or cancelled in Cuba because famed balerina Dame Alicia Alonso was enraged by his description of her racism, has been taken up by the US dependent and officialist media, including Cubanet, Diario de Cuba, and Marti Noticias. Would they only spend a fraction of their effort dealing with the rabidly violent racism in Florida, and we might see real progress where lives are at stake. They might even seek to integrate the world of ballet in Miami, which is nowhere near as diverse as that of Cuba: Misty Copeland Visits Cuba, Where Brown Ballerinas Are The Norm  vs Googling images of ballet Miami .

Acosta's autobiography came out in English in 2007, which has given the comrades a great deal of time to prepare for how to deal with it  and prepare the publication of the Spanish edition. Periodically, we hear the comment that Alicia Alonso, a icon of hispanic Cuban culture, receives far more money and resources for her dance troupe than the Conjunto Folklorico Nacional or other national level afrocuban groups. That is in keeping with the eurocentric nature of Cuba's cultural establishment. But this is true across the western world. The difference here is that Cuba is majority black and these issues are much harder to discuss. In the USA, if true, this story would be front page news, right alongside the daily killings by police. This officialist US media tends to attack the Instituto del Libro, but the Instituto is clearly only following orders from a higher level which is very much enamored with la Dama Alonso. That is where the problem lies. Some of the background to that higher level can be found here:

Fidel y el ballet cubano  8/4/2016 Granma: "Dos personas muy cercanas a Alicia y Fernando y al quehacer del conjunto, fueron claves en hacer posible que Fidel, desde los días de la Sierra Maestra y en los primeros momentos del triunfo revolucionario, pudiese estar al tanto de la magnitud que entrañó tan injusta agresión para la cultura de nuestra Patria. Fueron ellos el Dr. Julio Martínez Páez, Comandante del Ejér­cito Rebelde, combatiente de la Columna 1, al mando del líder de la Re­vo­lu­ción hasta el final de la guerra y primer ministro de Salud Pública del Gobierno Revo­lu­cio­nario; y el Capitán Antonio Núñez, topógrafo del Che en la contienda del Escambray y Santa Clara."

Maykel Paneque, a Cuban journalist who lives in Cuba, adds some interesting details in the Havana Times, which is definitely not part of the US officialist media.

Cuban Dancer Carlos Acosta in the World of Alicia Alonso  6/23/2016 Havana Times: by Maykel Paneque - "Of course, he’s referring to the Prima Ballerina Assoluta Alicia Alonso, who is supposedly responsible for the arbitrary action of calling off the book release event that was scheduled for June 11th. The Cuban National Ballet’s founder has also been accused of having raised her voice, or her hand, and interfering on several other occasions so that the book wouldn’t be published on the island. This explains why Carlos Acosta’s autobiography (in spite of there already being two editions in English, the first one dating back to 2007) has had to wait nine long years to be accepted by any Cuban state-owned publishing company, because private ones don’t exist, and we don’t know when they’ll be allowed. How can we explain such a delay, when we’re talking about the confessions of Cuba’s best dancer, who is even considered the world’s best by some experts in the field of ballet? Furthermore, how can a military commando dressed as civilians burst into the Cuban Book Institute, bag the entire lot of the autobiography and then store them in an undisclosed location?"

El libro de Carlos Acosta ya no se presentará este sábado en La Habana  6/12/2016 Afromodernidades: "El libro estuvo antes en el plan de publicaciones de Unión, la casa editorial de la Unión de Escritores y Artistas de Cuba, pero jamás hizo el viaje de la redacción a la imprenta. Según se conoció, por susurros, la ira y el autoritarismo de Alicia Alonso fueron la causa de tal decisión. Dicen los que ya leyeron esas páginas, yo no estoy entre ellos, que el autor cuenta de su pobre infancia, de sus estudios en la escuela cubana de ballet y de su desempeño en el Ballet Nacional de Cuba. Gran importancia cobra en la historia, su condición de muchacho pobre y negro. Al parecer, aunque todos reconocieran en la compañía que se trataba de un gran bailarín, Carlos Acosta sufrió por el racismo de su directora. Y no le tembló la mano al gran bailarín, convertido luego en escritor, a la hora de relatar ciertos pasajes que probaban la predisposición que sufría Alicia cuando se ponía delante de un bailarín o bailarina con una concentración de melanina en sangre algo superior a la de ella."

Los iconos no se tocan  6/11/2016 Diario de la Marina: "No obstante, según varia fuentes, la decisión se habría tomado en una reunión en la que estuvieron presentes el propio Malagón, la presidenta del ICL, Zuleica Romay, y un representante de Alicia Alonso."

Carlos Acosta no pudo bailar el racismo de Alicia  6/11/2016 El Fogonero: "La cosa iba muy bien hasta que llegó el momento de presentar su autobiografía, donde acusa a Alicia Alonso de racista y cuenta su negra experiencia en el Ballet Nacional del Cuba. Todo estaba listo para el lanzamiento, pero al final no pudo ocurrir y, hasta ahora, nadie ha dado una explicación."

Suspendida la presentación en La Habana del libro de memorias de Carlos Acosta  6/10/2016 Diario de Cuba: "El director de Arte y Litera, Víctor Malagón, consultado por DDC, afirmó desconocer las razones de la cancelación de la presentación y si había nueva fecha. No obstante, según varia fuentes, la decisión se habría tomado en una reunión en la que estuvieron presentes el propio Malagón, la presidenta del ICL, Zuleica Romay, y un representante de Alicia Alonso. La suspensión del acto ha causado asombro en el ICL."

El poder de Alicia Alonso se extiende al mundo editorial cubano  6/10/2016 Marti Noticias: "Una decisión de Chery (la eminente profesora Ramona de Sáa), sobre la que Carlos apunta: “en el círculo del ballet, la gente se refiere a ella como quién salvó la carrera de Carlos Acosta”. Fue en el English National Ballet donde Ben Stevenson lo vió. En la compañía cubana, Acosta, ya ganador de dos Grand Prix, el de Lausanne y el de París –los más prestigiosos–, no fue aceptado sino como “solista”, cuatro categorías por debajo de la que ostentaba en la agrupación inglesa. Reponen Edipo Rey, y Carlos ingenuamente espera que le adjudiquen el rol titular que había hecho célebre a Jorge Esquivel. Pero bailó –es un decir– el papel del viejo que debe matar a Edipo. Envejecido por el maquillaje y el vestuario, los demás bailarines lo chiquearon diciéndole que se parecía a Celia Cruz. Carlos se sintió humillado. Lo peor: sabía que pasarían muchos años hasta que pudiese bailar Giselle. Entonces, pensaba, ya sólo podré ser Albrecht con mi corazón y no con la plenitud de mis piernas. Tres semanas después –mientras tanto, había bailado un Espectro de la rosa en el que la malla rosada lo hacía lucir como the Pink Panther–, recibe la carta de Stevenson. Enseguida lo llamó, y una semana más tarde Stevenson aterrizaba en La Habana".

Suspendida presentación en La Habana de la autobiografía de Carlos Acosta  6/10/2016 Cibercuba: "De hecho ya resulta extraño que un libro que fue publicado por primera vez en el lejano 2007 con el título "No Way Home: A Cuban Dancer`s Story", por la editorial Harper Collins, en el Reino Unido; y luego por Scribner’s, en los EE.UU., haya tenido que esperar hasta el 2016 para ser editado en Cuba (siendo también la primera edición en español). Cuentan que el libro, antes de acabar siendo publicado por el sello Arte y Literatura, estuvo en el plan de publicaciones de Unión (la casa editorial de la UNEAC), pero la publicación no se llegó a concretar por la intervención de Alicia Alonso, muy disgustada con lo que de ella se dice en el libro."

Carlos Acosta y el racismo de Alicia Alonso  6/9/2016 Cubanet: "Lo más probable es que no se mencione a la directora del Ballet Nacional de Cuba. Nadie va a comunicar a los posibles lectores, que Alicia Alonso está ofendidísima, con el bailarín negro, negro bailarín preferiría decir ella, porque pone al descubierto su racismo. Se comentó y se comenta todavía, que algunas autoridades del Ballet Nacional de Cuba harían algunas aclaraciones previas a la salida del libro, donde demostrarían que no existe ningún ápice de racismo en el corazón de la bailarina y directora, pero al parecer no se pusieron de acuerdo y el libro no podrá salir ahora, al menos hasta que se haga el desmentido que limpie la imagen de la Alonso."

Carlos Acosta: 'Nobody who looks like me has ever played the roles I danced'  3/29/2016 Telegraph: “I am establishing a dance academy in Cuba and giving people from around the world the opportunity to study dance for free,” he says. “They are proud of me in my home country and supportive, but it is a place where things move very slowly; so many meetings and meetings about meetings.”

Where are the black ballet dancers? 9/4/2012 Guardian: "Nor is this dramatic imbalance limited to the UK: the picture is poor worldwide. Russia's elite Bolshoi Ballet has no black dancers in its company of 218; there are very few black dancers at any of the major US and British companies. The Royal Ballet has four – three men and one woman – in a company of 96. At the Central School of Ballet, which trains many future ballet stars, there are four black dancers in a student body of 110. Carlos Acosta, principal guest artist for the Royal Ballet and one of the world's most successful black dancers, agrees that the statistics are discouraging. "The percentage of classical black ballet dancers around the world is sadly minimal, which is quite embarrassing," he says."

Cubano estrella del Royal Ballet llama a "erradicar" racismo en la danza  4/22/2010 La Prensa, Honduras: "El cubano Carlos Acosta, estrella del británico Royal Ballet, abogó por erradicar el racismo de las compañías de ballet del mundo, aunque admitió que no sufrió prejuicios raciales en su carrera artística de 21 años, en una entrevista divulgada este miércoles. "Esto de los negros que no existen en el ballet es un fenómeno global que tenemos que erradicar", dijo Acosta, al citar como ejemplo que son sólo tres en el Royal Ballet, lo que calificó de "revolución", en la entrevista con el programa de televisión "Con 2 que se quieran", difundida también en el sitio oficialista Cubadebate."

Fidel attends Carlos Acosta‘s choreographic debut  2/17/2003 Granma, Cuba: Acosta wanted to be a lead ballet dancer, but the national dance company did not want a black in that role, so he went abroad to Euope and the US to make his fame. At 24, he is back in Cuba putting on a show about his life, to the acclaim of all. - "After the audience’s applause had faded away, Fidel mounted the stage to discuss the show, the book that Carlos Acosta is currently writing, and today’s dance in Cuba. In the presence of the cast and principal figures involved in the performance, including maestro Fernando Alonso and Contemporary Dance Company director Miguel Iglesias, the Cuban leader expressed his interest in national dance training centers and dance companies. He manifested his confidence that the country’s current cultural and educational policies will enable more children, like the lead role in Tocororo, to find new and better horizons through dance." - Words followed by deeds, witness recent contracts given to such groups as Raices Profundas to teach across Cuba.

 

Bio

"Carlos Acosta was born in Cuba in 1973. He began his dance studies at age ten at the National Ballet School of Cuba, in Havana, receiving his diploma in June, 1991, with maximum qualifications and a gold medal.

Mr. Acosta has won numerous national and international awards, including the gold medal at the Prix de Lausanne (Jan. 1990), the Spanish Vegnale Dance Prix in Italy (Aug. 1990), the grand prix and gold medal at the Fourth Annual Competition of Ballet in Paris (Nov. 1990) and the grand prix in the Third Juvenile Competition of Dance (June, 1991)."
-- www.galadesetoiles.com/bios/acosta.html

Carlos Acosta and his topAché, 6/20/04

by Pedro Pérez-Sarduy, London, in brochure for the shows Sadler's Wells, 6/29-7/24/04

From the mid-16th century, large numbers of slaves were brought from Africa to work on the plantations for coffee and other produce, and later in what was to be the major commodity of Spain’s Caribbean colony: sugar cane. Uprooted from the coasts of the Gulf of Guinea and the jungles of the Congo, the Africans were the profitable merchandise of the slave trade. Theirs is the legacy of sub-Saharan West Africa, and especially the Yoruba, from what is today Nigeria, who most influenced the process of cultural and religious transculturation, rapidly extending their customs and establishing a long lineage of influence in other African cultures that already existed in Cuba. Elements of their culture, stronger than the rest, shaped the birth and transculturated expressions of that which is Cuban heritage today.

It was at the height of Cuba’s sugar expansion (late 18th and early 19th Century) that Yoruba mythology transplanted to Cuba was significantly reshaped as it came into contact with other religious forms of African origin and Catholicism. This spontaneously gave rise to what has been called the ‘syncretism’ between the religious ritual and belief system known as Regla de Ocha, or Santería, based on the worship of the Yoruba pantheon of the orishas and their corresponding Catholic saints. Santería is, de facto, a Cuban religion grounded on personal dialogue with the deities. With practitioners of all colours, Santería has travelled beyond Cuba’s shores and across the seas as a form of popular hybrid spirit worship and is today practised by not only those of African descent of all ages but also by other nationals and foreigners, on and off the island.

As Cuba ceased to be only a political curiosity to become a tourist mecca, brochures and guidebooks have familiarized visitors with the saying that in Cuba ‘if you don’t have some congo you have some carabalí’ – in reference to two of the African ethnic groupings brought during the 355 years that the slave trade officially lasted. Thus, this timeless and apparently conciliatory phrase is one which Cubans have come to adopt as their best claim to cultural identity.

This ethnic and cultural mestizaje – or mix, born of tears, sweat and blood – may be perverse for some but is for others their only reason for existing. And for the great majority of those whose birthplace is the island, this is the hybridity of being Cuban: a cocktail not only of African and Spanish but also of other ingredients, including Chinese. None of the arts in Cuba have escaped this, but rather have succumbed to the realm of spiritual and artistic creation. The visual arts, literature, theatre, film, music or dance have all embraced that mix, the latter two most markedly so.

In the Afro-Cuban arts, mestizaje has significant resistance, both in terms of memory and values scorned by officialdom, and also to attain a status in cultural history that transcends the exotic. It is through this prism that Tocororo, the opera prima of Carlos Acosta, must be appreciated. Cuban choreographers of contemporary dance and ballet have long manifested the influence of popular culture. In Tocororo (named after the multicoloured national bird of Cuba), Acosta’s performance is one that has never been seen before by a Cuban dancer trained in the tradition of classical European ballet. He masterfully debunks the falsehood of another racist myth, that there can be no middle ground in dance: whites in ballet and blacks in contemporary modern dance or folklore.

Many may not have reflected on that painful hybridity in Cuba whose origins lie in a different way of viewing the world. A pas de deux becomes a rumba and then a guaguancó, another expression of the Afro-Cuban liturgy invoked by a majority of island inhabitants to celebrate their ancestors. The final apotheosis of the Cuban danzón and son is an ancestral fusion that today generates new forms of dance pleasure, a mix to be found both here and elsewhere.

Staging Cuban popular religiosity through contemporary modern dance or ballet carries with it a responsibility, because it is popular sentiment and rejection can be catastrophic. Yet Acosta dared take up the challenge, and his daring proved justified. Tocororo is a respectful and joyful tribute to those who came before him, and is at the same time his own offering. Acosta is no more but the child of fate, the boy of humble origins whose dream magically came true. His destiny was to be born 15 years after the 1959 Revolution led by Fidel Castro, that dramatically changed Cuba. By the time he was born, literacy programmes had transformed town and countryside, schools for art instructors and, throughout the island, art schools, flourished. At this time young and old came together in a cultural endeavour that would give rise to freer, more spontaneous thinking. New young dancers coming through the ballet schools challenged false theories that classical European ballet was not for blacks. Acosta, dancing a classical Don Quixote in the matinee and a mambo by night in his Tocororo, is born of a people for whom the pleasure of dance is a way of life, not simply an elite aesthetic pleasure.

Acosta is more than the boy from the humble family deeply affected by the social changes sweeping the island. This young black Cuban – something not to be overlooked out of sympathy or ignorance – was born in a society different from that known by his parents. A society which enabled his talent to triumph over the many years of racial prejudice one faced, to become what he is today: the strong aesthetic image of a Cuban dancer, who is black and has aché, the power and strength the orishas bestow on their chosen. Aché pa’tí, Carlos.

Articles/Artículostop

El libro de Carlos Acosta ya no se presentará este sábado en La Habana  6/12/2016 Afromodernidades: "El libro estuvo antes en el plan de publicaciones de Unión, la casa editorial de la Unión de Escritores y Artistas de Cuba, pero jamás hizo el viaje de la redacción a la imprenta. Según se conoció, por susurros, la ira y el autoritarismo de Alicia Alonso fueron la causa de tal decisión. Dicen los que ya leyeron esas páginas, yo no estoy entre ellos, que el autor cuenta de su pobre infancia, de sus estudios en la escuela cubana de ballet y de su desempeño en el Ballet Nacional de Cuba. Gran importancia cobra en la historia, su condición de muchacho pobre y negro. Al parecer, aunque todos reconocieran en la compañía que se trataba de un gran bailarín, Carlos Acosta sufrió por el racismo de su directora. Y no le tembló la mano al gran bailarín, convertido luego en escritor, a la hora de relatar ciertos pasajes que probaban la predisposición que sufría Alicia cuando se ponía delante de un bailarín o bailarina con una concentración de melanina en sangre algo superior a la de ella."

Carlos Acosta no pudo bailar el racismo de Alicia  6/11/2016 El Fogonero: "La cosa iba muy bien hasta que llegó el momento de presentar su autobiografía, donde acusa a Alicia Alonso de racista y cuenta su negra experiencia en el Ballet Nacional del Cuba. Todo estaba listo para el lanzamiento, pero al final no pudo ocurrir y, hasta ahora, nadie ha dado una explicación."

Suspendida la presentación en La Habana del libro de memorias de Carlos Acosta  6/10/2016 Diario de Cuba: "El director de Arte y Litera, Víctor Malagón, consultado por DDC, afirmó desconocer las razones de la cancelación de la presentación y si había nueva fecha. No obstante, según varia fuentes, la decisión se habría tomado en una reunión en la que estuvieron presentes el propio Malagón, la presidenta del ICL, Zuleica Romay, y un representante de Alicia Alonso. La suspensión del acto ha causado asombro en el ICL."

El poder de Alicia Alonso se extiende al mundo editorial cubano  6/10/2016 Marti Noticias: "Una decisión de Chery (la eminente profesora Ramona de Sáa), sobre la que Carlos apunta: “en el círculo del ballet, la gente se refiere a ella como quién salvó la carrera de Carlos Acosta”. Fue en el English National Ballet donde Ben Stevenson lo vió. En la compañía cubana, Acosta, ya ganador de dos Grand Prix, el de Lausanne y el de París –los más prestigiosos–, no fue aceptado sino como “solista”, cuatro categorías por debajo de la que ostentaba en la agrupación inglesa. Reponen Edipo Rey, y Carlos ingenuamente espera que le adjudiquen el rol titular que había hecho célebre a Jorge Esquivel. Pero bailó –es un decir– el papel del viejo que debe matar a Edipo. Envejecido por el maquillaje y el vestuario, los demás bailarines lo chiquearon diciéndole que se parecía a Celia Cruz. Carlos se sintió humillado. Lo peor: sabía que pasarían muchos años hasta que pudiese bailar Giselle. Entonces, pensaba, ya sólo podré ser Albrecht con mi corazón y no con la plenitud de mis piernas. Tres semanas después –mientras tanto, había bailado un Espectro de la rosa en el que la malla rosada lo hacía lucir como the Pink Panther–, recibe la carta de Stevenson. Enseguida lo llamó, y una semana más tarde Stevenson aterrizaba en La Habana".

Suspendida presentación en La Habana de la autobiografía de Carlos Acosta  6/10/2016 Cibercuba: "De hecho ya resulta extraño que un libro que fue publicado por primera vez en el lejano 2007 con el título "No Way Home: A Cuban Dancer`s Story", por la editorial Harper Collins, en el Reino Unido; y luego por Scribner’s, en los EE.UU., haya tenido que esperar hasta el 2016 para ser editado en Cuba (siendo también la primera edición en español). Cuentan que el libro, antes de acabar siendo publicado por el sello Arte y Literatura, estuvo en el plan de publicaciones de Unión (la casa editorial de la UNEAC), pero la publicación no se llegó a concretar por la intervención de Alicia Alonso, muy disgustada con lo que de ella se dice en el libro."

Carlos Acosta y el racismo de Alicia Alonso  6/9/2016 Cubanet: "Lo más probable es que no se mencione a la directora del Ballet Nacional de Cuba. Nadie va a comunicar a los posibles lectores, que Alicia Alonso está ofendidísima, con el bailarín negro, negro bailarín preferiría decir ella, porque pone al descubierto su racismo. Se comentó y se comenta todavía, que algunas autoridades del Ballet Nacional de Cuba harían algunas aclaraciones previas a la salida del libro, donde demostrarían que no existe ningún ápice de racismo en el corazón de la bailarina y directora, pero al parecer no se pusieron de acuerdo y el libro no podrá salir ahora, al menos hasta que se haga el desmentido que limpie la imagen de la Alonso."

Stage Review: Carlos Acosta - A Classical Farewell  5/3/2016 LeftLion: "Carlos Acosta is a true ballet star. His physicality, strength and prowess as a dancer are unrivalled and his retirement from dancing, after 17 years with The Royal Ballet, will have hit his legions of fans hard. But he’s 42 now – it’s time. And besides, he has grand plans for the next stage in his career – to form a company of Cuban dancers in his home country and, having written his autobiography in 2007, to turn his hand to fiction."

Carlos Acosta cederá protagonismo a jóvenes bailarines de su compañía  4/2/2016 Cubadebate: "El bailarín cubano Carlos Acosta cederá protagonismo a los miembros de su recien creada compañía en el debut mundial de esta agrupación, y solo danzará el repertorio clásico, difunden hoy los organizadores de la gala."

Carlos Acosta: 'Nobody who looks like me has ever played the roles I danced'  3/29/2016 Telegraph: “I am establishing a dance academy in Cuba and giving people from around the world the opportunity to study dance for free,” he says. “They are proud of me in my home country and supportive, but it is a place where things move very slowly; so many meetings and meetings about meetings.”

Carlos Acosta webchat – as it happened  12/3/2015 The Guardian: "The ballet dancer joined us for a live webchat and discussed making movies, the secrets of his success and whether he would appear on Strictly Come Dancing."

Convoca el bailarín Carlos Acosta audiciones en Cuba para formar compañía  8/4/2015 Alma Mater: "Este año, el Círculo de Críticos de Gran Bretaña le concedió el Premio Nacional de Danza en reconocimiento a sus logros durante toda una vida dedicada a ese arte, y la crítica estadounidense aplaudió efusivamente en Norteamérica su versión de Don Quijote para la compañía británica. Los planes inmediatos del artista incluyen una nueva versión de la obra Carmen, concebida para el Royal, y prevista para estrenarse en el próximo mes de septiembre, cuando a la vez prevé dar los primeros pasos con su compañía en Cuba. A los 42 años de edad, Acosta tiene contados sus días como príncipe sobre la escena pero su carrera en otras facetas del arte apenas nace, dentro de su país es Premio Nacional de Danza y en Reino Unido incluso lo llaman Sir, nombramiento dado en 2014 por el título de Comandante del Imperio Británico."

Carlos Acosta is the image and inspiration for a dance program  10/7/2014 Cuba Headlines 

Dancer Carlos Acosta Will Say Goodbye to Ballet in 2015  5/28/2014 Radio Havana 

Waterstones 11: Carlos Acosta, a leap from ballet to books  1/19/2013 Telegraph, UK: "His exceptionally virile physicality, astounding jump (which led him, in the US, to be known as “Air Acosta”) and beguilingly unselfconscious rendering of characters, led Acosta to become the Royal’s first ever black principal dancer, an achievement of which he remains justly proud. He has repeatedly dazzled both public and critics in roles as diverse as the duplicitous Albrecht in the Romantic classic Giselle, the lusty farmhand Colas in Frederick Ashton’s 1960 masterpiece La Fille mal gardée, and the Messenger of Death in Kenneth MacMillan’s far darker Song of the Earth. And, at 39 – an age at which many dancers are considering hanging up their tights – he continues to be a guest principal artist with the company, a performer whose name on any poster more or less guarantees bums on seats. Nor is Acosta's new book Pig’s Foot, an ambitious story encompassing a broad sweep of Cuban history, even his first successful literary venture. In 2007, his bittersweet autobiography No Way Home was published to a warm reception. It is, however, his first attempt at fiction, which – considering how very few novels by dancers there are – makes the achievement all the more remarkable."

Carlos Acosta and his second book  1/17/2013 Radio Havana: "Renowned Cuban dancer and choreographer Carlos Acosta has published his second book Pata de puerco (Pig leg). The work was included on the annual list of most promising novels recently published in England, the Waterstones 11, that recognizes the values of the best stories written by authors making their debut as writers. The story of Pata de puerco by Acosta takes place in Cuba, and narrates part of the island’s independence struggles, which began at the end of the 19th century."

Novela de bailarín Carlos Acosta alcanza repercusiones  1/16/2013 Cuba Escena: "La obra resultó incluida entre las más prometedoras novelas publicadas recientemente en Inglaterra, lugar donde reside Acosta, de 39 años de edad, quien fue nombrado en los Waterstones 11, una lista anual que reconoce las mejores historias escritas por autores debutantes, lo cual resulta una especie de galardón anticipado."

Tour jeté through a controversy  9/12/2012 Progreso Weekly: "Carlos Acosta, 39, one of the few black dancers in classical ballet, likened by critics to Nureyev, was at the center of one of those disputes where genuine concerns are often entwined with embroilments and human defects. The core of the issue was stated by Italian architect Vittorio Garatti in a letter to the top Cuban authorities, where he reviewed the origins of a project with great social significance, the Cubanacán Art Schools, a complex built in 1961 in the area of Havana’s former Country Club, an admirable project because of its artistic purpose and architectural excellence. Garatti had designed the buildings, along with other professionals. His alarm is focused in one paragraph of his letter: “How is it possible, then, that a fine Cuban dancer, Carlos Acosta, trained in Alicia Alonso’s school in Havana and famous in London, can take over one of the National Schools of Art (the Ballet School) to use it as a personal and private dance school?”"

Where are the black ballet dancers?  9/4/2012 Guardian: "Nor is this dramatic imbalance limited to the UK: the picture is poor worldwide. Russia's elite Bolshoi Ballet has no black dancers in its company of 218; there are very few black dancers at any of the major US and British companies. The Royal Ballet has four – three men and one woman – in a company of 96. At the Central School of Ballet, which trains many future ballet stars, there are four black dancers in a student body of 110. Carlos Acosta, principal guest artist for the Royal Ballet and one of the world's most successful black dancers, agrees that the statistics are discouraging. "The percentage of classical black ballet dancers around the world is sadly minimal, which is quite embarrassing," he says."

Cubano estrella del Royal Ballet llama a "erradicar" racismo en la danza  4/22/2010 La Prensa, Honduras: "El cubano Carlos Acosta, estrella del británico Royal Ballet, abogó por erradicar el racismo de las compañías de ballet del mundo, aunque admitió que no sufrió prejuicios raciales en su carrera artística de 21 años, en una entrevista divulgada este miércoles. "Esto de los negros que no existen en el ballet es un fenómeno global que tenemos que erradicar", dijo Acosta, al citar como ejemplo que son sólo tres en el Royal Ballet, lo que calificó de "revolución", en la entrevista con el programa de televisión "Con 2 que se quieran", difundida también en el sitio oficialista Cubadebate."

Carlos Acosta, El bueno de la película  10/3/2009 Juventud Rebelde: "«Mi relación con el cine no viene de ahora», asegura Acosta, quien recientemente acabó de rodar en la capital cubana El día de las flores. Comenzó cuando Natalie Portman me llamó, en el año 2007. Regresaba a Londres después de haber bailado en algún lugar que no recuerdo, y entraba por el aeropuerto cuando recibí su llamada por el celular. Era para decirme que tenía un proyecto y que había escrito una historia pensando en mí. Conversamos, me explicó la trama y discutimos algunas posibles fechas para el rodaje. Luego ella viajó a Inglaterra. «La película se estrenará próximamente, después de dos años de haberla filmado. Se titula New York, I love you, y está conformada por cortometrajes de cinco a siete minutos, dirigidos por varios directores. En la mía, donde hago el protagónico, solo hay 20 segundos de danza; el resto es actuación. Resulta que en el filme soy un bailarín que se ha quedado a cargo de su hija, tras el fracaso de su matrimonio. Su esposa, cansada de estar con un hombre que apenas consigue trabajar, decide abandonarlo por un banquero."

Cuban Dancer Carlos Acosta Continues to Pile up Awards  5/23/2008 Cuba Now 

Nunca mirar atrás – El libro de Carlos Acosta  10/22/2007 Danza Ballet 

London Met honours celebrated dancer Carlos Acosta  8/1/2007 London Metropolitan University: published 12/06 - "Renowned Cuban dancer and choreographer, Carlos Acosta, is the latest recipient of a London Metropolitan University honorary award. Carlos was awarded a Doctor of Letters earlier today during the University's Health and Human Sciences and Psychology graduation ceremonies held at the Barbican Centre."

Manna from Havana  5/15/2005 Sunday Times: interview with Carlos Acosta - "He was a wayward teenager whose father believed he was plagued by evil spirits. Now Carlos Acosta is a world-class ballet star — but he still dances like a man possessed… But there is something that no amount of glittering biographical detail can convey. Something never touched on in the rags-to-riches tales. Something that only surfaces as Carlos starts to talk about the importance of Santeria in his home as he was growing up. It is, perhaps, the reason there seems a hint of sadness behind his seductive eyes. It is also, on his own admission, the reason he became such a superlative dancer. The key to its understanding lies with the deity with whom his father most identifies, Ogun."

El salto de Carlos Acosta  7/22/2004 BBC: published on 10/21/01, about dancer Carlos Acosta who is getting some attention in London these days - "Desde los suburbios de una zona pobre de La Habana hasta los lujosos escenarios del Royal Opera House en Londres o la Scala de Milán hay un salto tan grande que, incluso para alguien acostumbrado a realizar espectaculares piruetas sobre la tarima, resulta sorprendente."

CUBAN DANCER WILL present tocororo IN LONDON  6/29/2004 Cuba Now: "Acosta, considered the Best Dancer in 2003 by Great Britain’s National Dance Critics Circle, first presented Tocororo in Havana in January, then in London in February, and later in Mexico and the United States, where the press described him as “the bridge which fills the vacuum between Nureyev and Baryshnikov.” "

Carlos Acosta and his Aché  6/20/2004 AfroCubaWeb: by Pedro Pérez-Sarduy - "In Tocororo (named after the multicoloured national bird of Cuba), Acosta’s performance is one that has never been seen before by a Cuban dancer trained in the tradition of classical European ballet. He masterfully debunks the falsehood of another racist myth, that there can be no middle ground in dance: whites in ballet and blacks in contemporary modern dance or folklore. Many may not have reflected on that painful hybridity in Cuba whose origins lie in a different way of viewing the world. A pas de deux becomes a rumba and then a guaguancó, another expression of the Afro-Cuban liturgy invoked by a majority of island inhabitants to celebrate their ancestors. The final apotheosis of the Cuban danzón and son is an ancestral fusion that today generates new forms of dance pleasure, a mix to be found both here and elsewhere."

Fidel attends Carlos Acosta‘s choreographic debut  2/17/2003 Granma, Cuba: Acosta wanted to be a lead ballet dancer, but the national dance company did not want a black in that role, so he went abroad to Euope and the US to make his fame. At 24, he is back in Cuba putting on a show about his life, to the acclaim of all. - "After the audience’s applause had faded away, Fidel mounted the stage to discuss the show, the book that Carlos Acosta is currently writing, and today’s dance in Cuba. In the presence of the cast and principal figures involved in the performance, including maestro Fernando Alonso and Contemporary Dance Company director Miguel Iglesias, the Cuban leader expressed his interest in national dance training centers and dance companies. He manifested his confidence that the country’s current cultural and educational policies will enable more children, like the lead role in Tocororo, to find new and better horizons through dance." - Words followed by deeds, witness recent contracts given to such groups as Raices Profundas to teach across Cuba.
  

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CUBAN DANCER WILL present tocororo IN LONDON  6/29/04 Cuba Now: "Acosta, considered the Best Dancer in 2003 by Great Britain’s National Dance Critics Circle, first presented Tocororo in Havana in January, then in London in February, and later in Mexico and the United States, where the press described him as “the bridge which fills the vacuum between Nureyev and Baryshnikov.” "

Sadler's Well

 www.sadlerswells.com/whats_on/2003_2004/carlos_acosta_04.asp?id=ccomp

Profile: Carlos Acosta
www.londondance.com/content/318/profile:_carlos_acosta/

Fidel attends Carlos Acosta‘s choreographic debut, 2/17/03
www.granma.cu/ingles/feb03/lu17/7asiste.html

UN DON QUIJOTE DE ALTURA, Jiribilla, 10/03
www.lajiribilla.cu/2002/n77_octubre/1806_77.html
"No hay nada que se compare con este momento”, repetía al final del espectáculo el primer bailarín del Ballet Nacional de Cuba (BNC) Carlos Acosta. “Ha sido una función muy excitante", declaró su compatriota y compañera ocasional de baile, la también primera bailarina Viengsay Valdés.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carlos_Acosta

www.roh.org.uk/people/carlos-acosta

 

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